Glossary of "T"

  • A (36)
  • B (19)
  • C (58)
  • D (26)
  • E (34)
  • F (43)
  • G (20)
  • H (19)
  • I (27)
  • J (11)
  • K (1)
  • L (16)
  • M (27)
  • N (18)
  • O (18)
  • P (33)
  • Q (5)
  • R (30)
  • S (59)
  • T (16)
  • U (4)
  • V (7)
  • W (39)
"Treating outcomes of social capital as its indicator will necessarily find social capital to be related to those outcomes." (Edwards) "… logical circularity. As a propensity of communities and...

Edwards, R. (2002, October 18). Social Capital, A Sloan Work and Family Encyclopedia Entry. Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College.

As defined by Edwards citing: Durlauf, S.N. (1999) The case "against" social capital. Focus, 20(3), p. 1-5.

Portes, A. (1998). Social capital: its origins and applications in modern sociology. Annual Review of Sociology, 24(1), p. 1-24.

"A subset of alternative work options where work is conducted at an off-site location and the employee uses telecommunications technology, including computers, video, and telephone systems, fax...

Kossek, E. (2003). Telecommuting, A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Encyclopedia Entry. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Work and Family Research Network.

Social Networks. (2002). In Frank Abate, (Ed.), The Oxford American dictionary of current English in English dictionaries and thesauruses. UK: Oxford University Press, Inc. Internet Explorer. www.oxfordreference.com (13 June 2003)

Bailey, D., & Kurland, N. (2002). A review of telework research: Findings, new directions, and lessons for the study of modern work. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 23(4), 383-400.

Niles, J.M. (1998). Managing telework: Strategies for managing the virtual workforce. New York: John Wiley and Sons.

"Another word for telecommute." (Kossek, 2003). "Work, esp. at home, communicating electronically with one's employer, etc., by computer, fax, and telephone." (Pearsall, 2003). Working outside...

Kossek, E. (2003). Telecommuting, A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Encyclopedia Entry. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Work and Family Research Network.

Telework. (2003). In Judy Pearsall, (Ed.), The concise Oxford dictionary in English dictionaries and thesauruses. UK: Oxford University Press, Inc. Internet Explorer. www.oxfordreference.com (13 June 2003).

Bailey, D., & Kurland, N. (2002). A review of telework research: Findings, new directions, and lessons for the study of modern work. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 23(4), 383-400.

Niles, J.M. (1998). Managing telework: Strategies for managing the virtual workforce.New York: John Wiley and Sons.

“A subset of alternative work options where work is conducted at an off-site location and the employee uses telecommunications technology, including computers, video, and telephone systems, fax...

Kossek, E. (2003). Telecommuting, A Sloan Work and Family Research Network Encyclopedia Entry. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Work and Family Research Network.

Social Networks (2002). In Frank Abate, (Ed.), The Oxford American dictionary of current English in English dictionaries and thesauruses. UK: Oxford University Press, Inc. Retrieved June 13, 2003, from www.oxfordreference.com

Bailey, D., & Kurland, N. (2002). A review of telework research: Findings, new directions, and lessons for the study of modern work. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 23(4), 383-400.

Norms of working hours which prevail. (Schor).

As defined by Schor.

"A person who is furnished to the insured as a substitute to a permanent employee on leave or to meet seasonal or short-term workload conditions." (Reynolds, 2002)" Temporary employees are excluded...

Reynolds, W.C. (2002). Leased & temporary employee insurance considerations: Beware of costly coverage gaps. Retrieved March 30, 2007, from http://www.transportationoracle.com/risk_mng_hcs_11.html.

Nowicki, C. (2002). Fair Labor Standards: A Sloan Work and Family Encyclopedia entry. Retrieved March 30, 2007, from http://wfnetwork.bc.edu/encyclopedia_entry.php?id=230&area=academics.

Fears, D. & Fletcher, M.A. (2005, October 19). "Temporary worker program is explained." The Washington Post. Retrieved March 30, 2007, from http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/10/18/AR2005101801613.html?nav=rss_politics.

The 1965 Immigration Act abolished the national-origin quota system that had been executed in the United States since the Immigration Act of 1924. From 1924 to 1965, the U.S. government limited the...

Lee, E. (2006). A nation of immigrants and a gatekeeping nation: American immigration law and policy. In R. Ueda (Ed.), A companion to American immigration (pp. 5-35). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

“The provider myth assumes the woman should stay home to care for the family, yet the job with its responsibilities is created for an employee who will not take an extended leave for any reason” (...

Swanberg, J.E. (2004). Illuminating gendered organization assumptions. An important step in creating a family-friendly organization: a case study.  Community, Work & Family, 7(1), 3-28.  

“The day is divided into three working periods - morning, afternoon and night. This kind of shiftwork usually, but not always, involves one or more weeks of mornings, followed by one or more weeks of...

Hurrell, K. (2003, March). Statistics on shiftwork: Survey questions, definitions and classifications. Retrieved August 3, 2005, from http://www.iwh.on.ca/media/images/Shiftwork.pdf

"Tied movers participate in [geographic] moves that result in a net loss for themselves but positive net returns for the family." Tied movers are also known as trailing spouses.

As defined by Compton, J., & Pollak, R. A. (2007). Why Are Power Couples Increasingly Concentrated in Large Metropolitan Areas? Journal of Labor Economics, 25(3), 475-512.

"Tied stayers forgo [geographic] moves that would result in positive net returns for the individual but negative net returns for the family."

As defined by Compton, J., & Pollak, R. A. (2007). Why Are Power Couples Increasingly Concentrated in Large Metropolitan Areas? Journal of Labor Economics, 25(3), 475-512.

“Time-based conflict occurs when the time demands associated with one role restrict the amount of time that can be devoted to the other role, inhibiting one’s performance in the latter role” (...

Greenhaus, J. H., Allen, T. D., & Spector, P. E. (Forthcoming). Health consequences of work-family conflict: The dark side of the work-family interface. In Perrewe, P. L., & Ganster, D. C. (Eds.), Research in occupational stress and well-being, vol. 5. Amsterdam: Elsevier.

“The concept of the traditional family, that is, the ‘natural reproductive unit’ of mom, pop, and the children all living under one roof, is not an immutable one.  It is a social construct that...

Ball, H. (2002). The supreme court in the intimate lives of Americans: Birth, sex, marriage, childrearing, and death. New York, NY: New York University Press.

"May cross over at different points in time and they may proceed in parallel." (Brannen & Nilsen) "Rails for a tramcar." (Pearsall, 2003). Used as a metaphor to convey the trajectories of...

Brannen, J. & Nilsen, A. (2003, January 28). Adulthood: Changing Concepts and Definitions, A Sloan Work and Family Encyclopedia Entry. Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College.

Social Networks. (2003). In Judy Pearsall, (Ed.), The concise Oxford dictionary in English dictionaries and thesauruses. UK: Oxford University Press, Inc. Internet Explorer.www.oxfordreference.com (13 June 2003).

Elder, G. (1978). Family history and the life course. In T. K. Hareven (Ed.), Transitions: the family and the life course in historical perspective. New York: Academic Press.

"Patterned behaviors signifying to the individual (and sometimes to others) that he or she is in the process of exiting one role and preparing to enter another." (Desrochers & Sargent) Ashforth,...

Desrochers S. & Sargent, L. (2003, September 09). Boundary/Border Theory and Work-Family Integration, A Sloan Work and Family Encyclopedia Entry. Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College.

As defined by Desrochers citing Ashforth, Kreiner & Fugate:

Ashforth, B. E., Kreiner, G. E., & Fugate, M. (2000). All in a day's work: Boundaries and micro role transitions. Academy of Management Review, 25(3), 472-491.

Transnational families have members spread out across nation states but still maintain a sense of collective welfare and unity. Their kinship networks cross at ‘residential nodes’ in two or several...

(Bjeren 1997: 237, Bryceson and Vuorela 2002)