Social Capital, Definition(s) of

  • A (36)
  • B (19)
  • C (58)
  • D (26)
  • E (34)
  • F (43)
  • G (20)
  • H (19)
  • I (27)
  • J (11)
  • K (1)
  • L (16)
  • M (27)
  • N (18)
  • O (18)
  • P (33)
  • Q (5)
  • R (30)
  • S (59)
  • T (16)
  • U (4)
  • V (7)
  • W (39)

"Broadly, social capital concerns the norms and values people hold that result in, and are the result of, collective and socially negotiated ties and relationships. It is integrally related to other forms of capital, such as human (skills and qualifications), economic (wealth), cultural (modes of thinking) and symbolic (prestige and personal qualities). For example, economic capital augments social capital, and cultural capital can be readily translated into human and social capitals (Edwards, 2002)."

“’Social capital’ - an analytic term used to explain the stratification process at individual and aggregate levels” (Dominguez & Watkins, 2003, p. 112).

“On the individual level, social capital refers to one’s access to resources through reciprocal social networks” (Ciabattari, 2007, p. 35).

Glossary Source: 

Edwards, R. (2002). Social capital, A Sloan work and family encyclopedia entry. Chestnut Hill, MA; The Sloan Work adn Family Research Network.

Dominguez, S., & Watkins, C. (2003). Creating Networks for Survival and Mobility: Social Capital Among African-American and Latin-American Low-Income Mothers. Social Problems, 50(1) 111-135.

Ciabattari, T. (2007). Single mothers, social capital, and work-family conflict. Journal of Family Issues, 28, 34-60.