Generation X, Definition(s) of

  • A (36)
  • B (19)
  • C (58)
  • D (26)
  • E (34)
  • F (43)
  • G (20)
  • H (19)
  • I (27)
  • J (11)
  • K (1)
  • L (16)
  • M (27)
  • N (18)
  • O (18)
  • P (33)
  • Q (5)
  • R (30)
  • S (59)
  • T (16)
  • U (4)
  • V (7)
  • W (39)

Ages 23-37 (in 2002) (Families & Work Institute, 2004).

“people born between 1964 and 1975” Catalyst, 2001, p. 2).

“Born between 1967 and 1979…” (Allen, 2004). 

“Conger (1998) describes generation X as people born and raised in the information age...” (Twomey, Lineham, & Walsh, 2002, p.117).

“There is even less agreement for the Gen X-ers’ birth years, reported to begin somewhere in the early 1960s and end in 1975, 1980, 1981, or 1982 (Adams, 2000; Jurkiewicz & Brown, 1998; Karp, Sirias, & Arnold, 1999; Kupperschmidt, 2000; O’Bannon, 2001; Scott, 2000)…the Gen X-ers have 45 million in their cohort (Schaeffer, 2000)” (Smola & Sutton, 2002, p. 364).

Generation X: “…the 20-40 year-olds who fall between the post-war baby boomers and their children” (Bu & McKeen, 2000, p. 772).

Glossary Source: 

Families & Work Institute (2004). Generation & gender in the workplace. Watertown, MA: American Business Collaboration.

Allen, P. (2004). Welcoming Y. Benefits Canada, 28(9), 51-53.

Twomey, A.M., Lineham, M., & Walsh, J.S. (2002). Career progression of young female accountants: Evidence from the accountancy profession in Ireland. Journal of European Industrial Training, 26(2/3/4), 117-124.

Smola, K.W., & Sutton, C.D. (2002). Generational differences: Revisiting generational work values for the new millennium. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 23, 363-382.

Bu, N., & McKeen, C.A. (2000). Work and family expectations of the future managers and professionals of Canada and China. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 15(8), 771-794.

Catalyst. (2001). The next generation: Today’s professionals, tomorrow’s leaders. New York: Catalyst.