Employer-Supported Child Care

Child Care: employer-supported, on or off-site care, access, private sector (2006)

Statistic: 

According to the 2006 National Compensation Survey Employee Benefits in Private Industry in the United States, 7% of white-collar occupations had access to onsite/offsite child care benefits, compared with 2% of blue-collar workers (U.S. Department of Labor, 2006, p. 28).

Source: 

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (2006). National compensation survey: Employee benefits in private industry in the United States. Washington, DC: Author.

Description: 

“The sample for the National Compensation Survey (NCS) (Wages, Benefits, Compensation Cost Trends --Employment Cost Index (ECI) and Employment Costs for Employee Compensation (ECEC)) is selected using a three-stage design. The first stage involves the selection of areas. The NCS sample consists of 154 metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas that represent the Nation's 326 metropolitan statistical areas and the remaining portions of the 50 States. In the second stage, the sample of establishments is drawn by dividing the sample by industry and ownership. Each sample establishment is selected using a method of sampling called probability proportional to employment size. The third stage of sampling is a probability sample of occupations within a sampled establishment. This step is performed by the field economist during an interview with the respondent using a method called Probability Selection of Occupations (PSO). During this process, the field economist obtains a complete list of employees with each selected employee representing a job within the establishment. As with establishment selection, the selection of a job is based on probability proportional to its size in the establishment. The greater the number of people working in a particular job, the greater the job's chance of selection. The field economist selects a certain number of sample occupations depending on the size of the establishment.”

Child Care: employer-supported, resource and referral, access union workers, private sector (2006)

Statistic: 

According to the 2006 National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in Private Industry in the United States, 17% of unionized private-sector workers had access to resource/referral for child care, compared with 10% for non-unionized workers. (U.S. Department of Labor, 2006, p. 28)

Source: 

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (2006). National compensation survey: Employee benefits in private industry in the United States. Washington, DC: Author.

Description: 

Description of Sample: “The sample for the National Compensation Survey (NCS) (Wages, Benefits, Compensation Cost Trends --Employment Cost Index (ECI) and Employment Costs for Employee Compensation (ECEC)) is selected using a three-stage design. The first stage involves the selection of areas. The NCS sample consists of 154 metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas that represent the Nation's 326 metropolitan statistical areas and the remaining portions of the 50 States. In the second stage, the sample of establishments is drawn by dividing the sample by industry and ownership. Each sample establishment is selected using a method of sampling called probability proportional to employment size. The third stage of sampling is a probability sample of occupations within a sampled establishment. This step is performed by the field economist during an interview with the respondent using a method called Probability Selection of Occupations (PSO). During this process, the field economist obtains a complete list of employees with each selected employee representing a job within the establishment. As with establishment selection, the selection of a job is based on probability proportional to its size in the establishment. The greater the number of people working in a particular job, the greater the job's chance of selection. The field economist selects a certain number of sample occupations depending on the size of the establishment.”

Child Care: employer-supported, financial support, adoption assistance, private sector (2006)

Statistic: 

According to the 2006 National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in Private Industry in the United States, 3% of private-sector workers had access to employer-provided funds for child care, compared with 10% of workers who had access to adoption assistance. (U.S. Department of Labor, 2006, p. 28)

Source: 

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (2006). National compensation survey: Employee benefits in private industry in the United States. Washington, DC: Author.

Description: 

Description of Sample: “The sample for the National Compensation Survey (NCS) (Wages, Benefits, Compensation Cost Trends --Employment Cost Index (ECI) and Employment Costs for Employee Compensation (ECEC)) is selected using a three-stage design. The first stage involves the selection of areas. The NCS sample consists of 154 metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas that represent the Nation's 326 metropolitan statistical areas and the remaining portions of the 50 States. In the second stage, the sample of establishments is drawn by dividing the sample by industry and ownership. Each sample establishment is selected using a method of sampling called probability proportional to employment size. The third stage of sampling is a probability sample of occupations within a sampled establishment. This step is performed by the field economist during an interview with the respondent using a method called Probability Selection of Occupations (PSO). During this process, the field economist obtains a complete list of employees with each selected employee representing a job within the establishment. As with establishment selection, the selection of a job is based on probability proportional to its size in the establishment. The greater the number of people working in a particular job, the greater the job's chance of selection. The field economist selects a certain number of sample occupations depending on the size of the establishment.”

Child Care: employer-supported, assistance, prevalence (2003)

Statistic: 

According to a 2003 Work/Life Benefits report by Hewitt Associates, “child care assistance remains the most prevalent work/life program, with 95% of employers today offering some kind of assistance to their employees (up from 87% in 1998)” (Hewitt Associates, 2003, p. 1).

Source: 

Hewitt Associates (2003). SpecSummary: United States salaried work/life benefits, 2003-2004. Lincolnshire, IL: Author.

Description: 

“During the last five years, there has been continued growth in the number of employers offering programs and policies that help employees better juggle their lives at work and outside of work. Employers have realized these work/life programs are key in attracting, motivating and retaining the best employees. In addition, by taking advantage of work/life initiatives, employees can better manage their life responsibilities and outside interests, and as a result, can be more focused and productive at work. We continue to see our employers expanding and offering new work/life programs even in light of recent economic conditions….What type of programs are most commonly offered? To find out, Hewitt has collected data on work/life benefit plans for salaried employees of 975 major U.S. employers. Data is based on plan-by-plan specifications included in the 2003-2004 Hewitt Associates SpecBook.”

Child Care: employer-sponsored, resource and referral, prevalence (2003)

Statistic: 

According to a 2003 Work/Life Benefits report by Hewitt Associates, 42% of companies help employees find care, sometimes through their in-house referral service (6%), but more often by contracting with an outside referral service (37%). (Hewitt Associates, 2003, p. 4)


Source: 

Hewitt Associates (2003). SpecSummary: United States salaried work/life benefits, 2003-2004. Lincolnshire, IL: Author.

Description: 

“During the last five years, there has been continued growth in the number of employers offering programs and policies that help employees better juggle their lives at work and outside of work. Employers have realized these work/life programs are key in attracting, motivating and retaining the best employees. In addition, by taking advantage of work/life initiatives, employees can better manage their life responsibilities and outside interests, and as a result, can be more focused and productive at work. We continue to see our employers expanding and offering new work/life programs even in light of recent economic conditions….What type of programs are most commonly offered? To find out, Hewitt has collected data on work/life benefit plans for salaried employees of 975 major U.S. employers. Data is based on plan-by-plan specifications included in the 2003-2004 Hewitt Associates SpecBook.”

Child Care: employer-supported, sick/emergency care, prevalence (2003)

Statistic: 

According to a 2003 Work/Life Benefits report by Hewitt Associates, 13% of employers reported providing access to sick/emergency child care programs for their employees. (Hewitt Associates, 2003, p. 4)

Source: 

Hewitt Associates (2003). SpecSummary: United States salaried work/life benefits, 2003-2004. Lincolnshire, IL: Author.

Description: 

“During the last five years, there has been continued growth in the number of employers offering programs and policies that help employees better juggle their lives at work and outside of work. Employers have realized these work/life programs are key in attracting, motivating and retaining the best employees. In addition, by taking advantage of work/life initiatives, employees can better manage their life responsibilities and outside interests, and as a result, can be more focused and productive at work. We continue to see our employers expanding and offering new work/life programs even in light of recent economic conditions….What type of programs are most commonly offered? To find out, Hewitt has collected data on work/life benefit plans for salaried employees of 975 major U.S. employers. Data is based on plan-by-plan specifications included in the 2003-2004 Hewitt Associates SpecBook.” 

Child Care: employer-supported, on or near-site, subsidy, prevalence (2003)

Statistic: 

According to a 2003 Work/Life Benefits report by Hewitt Associates, 10% of employers offer subsidized access to on-site/near-site child care centers, compared with 1% for non-subsidized on-site/near-site centers and 2% for consortium centers. (Hewitt Associates, 2003, p. 4)




Source: 

Hewitt Associates (2003). SpecSummary: United States salaried work/life benefits, 2003-2004. Lincolnshire, IL: Author.

Description: 

“During the last five years, there has been continued growth in the number of employers offering programs and policies that help employees better juggle their lives at work and outside of work. Employers have realized these work/life programs are key in attracting, motivating and retaining the best employees. In addition, by taking advantage of work/life initiatives, employees can better manage their life responsibilities and outside interests, and as a result, can be more focused and productive at work. We continue to see our employers expanding and offering new work/life programs even in light of recent economic conditions….What type of programs are most commonly offered? To find out, Hewitt has collected data on work/life benefit plans for salaried employees of 975 major U.S. employers. Data is based on plan-by-plan specifications included in the 2003-2004 Hewitt Associates SpecBook.”

Child Care: employer-supported, discounts, local providers, prevalence (2003)

Statistic: 

According to a 2003 Work/Life Benefits report by Hewitt Associates, 9% of employers arranged discounts with local child care providers. (Hewitt Associates, 2003, p. 4)

Source: 

Hewitt Associates (2003). SpecSummary: United States salaried work/life benefits, 2003-2004. Lincolnshire, IL: Author.

Description: 

“During the last five years, there has been continued growth in the number of employers offering programs and policies that help employees better juggle their lives at work and outside of work. Employers have realized these work/life programs are key in attracting, motivating and retaining the best employees. In addition, by taking advantage of work/life initiatives, employees can better manage their life responsibilities and outside interests, and as a result, can be more focused and productive at work. We continue to see our employers expanding and offering new work/life programs even in light of recent economic conditions….What type of programs are most commonly offered? To find out, Hewitt has collected data on work/life benefit plans for salaried employees of 975 major U.S. employers. Data is based on plan-by-plan specifications included in the 2003-2004 Hewitt Associates SpecBook.”

Child Care: employer-sponsored, before and after school care, prevalence (2003)

Statistic: 

According to a 2003 Work/Life Benefits report by Hewitt Associates, 3% of employers offer before and after school care (either on-site or through the community). (Hewitt Associates, 2003, p. 4)

Source: 

Hewitt Associates (2003). SpecSummary: United States salaried work/life benefits, 2003-2004. Lincolnshire, IL: Author.

Description: 

“During the last five years, there has been continued growth in the number of employers offering programs and policies that help employees better juggle their lives at work and outside of work. Employers have realized these work/life programs are key in attracting, motivating and retaining the best employees. In addition, by taking advantage of work/life initiatives, employees can better manage their life responsibilities and outside interests, and as a result, can be more focused and productive at work. We continue to see our employers expanding and offering new work/life programs even in light of recent economic conditions….What type of programs are most commonly offered? To find out, Hewitt has collected data on work/life benefit plans for salaried employees of 975 major U.S. employers. Data is based on plan-by-plan specifications included in the 2003-2004 Hewitt Associates SpecBook.”

Afterschool Care: self-care, prevalence, unsupervised time (2006)

Statistic: 

"Child's time spent unsupervised averaged between 0 and 30 hours per week, but the majority of the target children (78.5%) spent no time unsupervised after school" (Barnett & Gareis, 2006, p. 1390).

Source: 

Barnett, R., & Gareis, K. (2006). Antecedents and correlates of parental after-school concern: Exploring a newly identified work-family stressor. American Behavioral Scientist, 49(10), 1382-1399.

Description: 

"In this analysis, we estimate these direct and indirect relationships in a series of regression analyses with a sample of 243 employed parents who have at least one school-age child and who work at a Fortune 500 financial services institution" (p. 1383).

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