Domestic Violence and the Workplace

Psychological/Emotional Violence, Definition(s) of

“Psychological/emotional violence involves trauma to the victim caused by acts, threats of acts, or coercive tactics. Psychological/emotional abuse can include, but is not limited to, humiliating the victim, controlling what the victim can and cannot do, withholding information from the victim, deliberately doing something to make the victim feel diminished or embarrassed, isolating the victim from friends and family, and denying the victim access to money or other basic resources” (CDC, 2007).

Glossary Source: 

United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Intimate partner violence: Overview. Retrieved on June 28, 2007, from: http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/intimatepartnerviolence/index.html.

Physical Violence, Definition(s) of

“Physical violence is the intentional use of physical force with the potential for causing death, disability, injury, or harm. Physical violence includes, but is not limited to, scratching; pushing; shoving; throwing; grabbing; biting; choking; shaking; slapping; punching; burning; use of a weapon; and use of restraints or one’s body, size, or strength against another person” (CDC, 2007).

Glossary Source: 

United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Intimate partner violence: Overview. Retrieved on June 28, 2007, from: http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/intimatepartnerviolence/index.html.

Sexual Violence, Definition(s) of

“Sexual violence is divided into three categories: 1) use of physical force to compel a person to engage in a sexual act against his or her will, whether or not the act is completed; 2) attempted or completed sex act involving a person who is unable to understand the nature or condition of the act, to decline participation, or to communicate unwillingness to engage in the sexual act, e.g., because of illness, disability, or the influence of alcohol or other drugs, or because of intimidation or pressure; and 3) abusive sexual contact” (CDC, 2007).

Glossary Source: 

United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Intimate partner violence: Overview. Retrieved on June 28, 2007, from: http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/intimatepartnerviolence/index.html.

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