Domestic Violence and the Workplace

Domestic Violence and the Workplace

Compiled by Chelsea Lettieri & Caitlin Sullivan

Topic Page Advisor:
Jennifer Swanberg, PhD 

A Sloan Network Fact Sheet on Domestic Violence and the Workplace (2010)

The Sloan Work and Family Research Network has prepared Fact Sheets which provide statistical answers to some important questions about work-family and work/life issues.

Click here to download the Sloan Network Fact Sheet on Domestic Violence and the Workplace: https://workfamily.sas.upenn.edu/sites/workfamily.sas.upenn.edu/files/imported/pdfs/DV.pdf

Paid Sick Days Initiative Would Support Milwaukee Victims of Domestic Violence (2008)

Milwaukee’s paid sick days referendum would allow workers to take time from their scheduled hours on the job to recover from illness. It would also guarantee more than 260,000 Milwaukeeans the ability to access services for domestic violence and sexual assault, without the risk of losing wages or a job. While a relatively small number of Milwaukee workers will likely need paid time off for these purposes, this job-protected paid time off could be critical to building family safety and security.”

Lovell, V. (2008). Paid sick days initiative would support Milwaukee victims of domestic violence. Retrieved from http://www.iwpr.org/pdf/B265_DomesticViolence.pdf

Effective Workplace Series (EWS), 2008, Issue 11: Domestic Violence

The Effective Workplace Series (EWS) was designed to provide a summary of the Sloan Network's topic pages.

To access this document (PDF): https://workfamily.sas.upenn.edu/sites/workfamily.sas.upenn.edu/files/imported/pdfs/EWS_DV.pdf

Policy Leadership Series (PLS / PBS), 2007, Issue 11 - Opportunities for Policy Leadership on Supporting Workers Experiencing Domestic Violence

By Chelsea Lettieri, Sandee Shulkin MSW, Judith Casey MSW

The Sloan Work and Family Research Network has created a series of publications called, the Policy Leadership Series.  These publications provide state legislators and their staff with answers to questions about specific work-family issues, such as, “How does afterschool care affect my constituents?” and “What can be done about telework?” This publication is mailed to legislators across the United States.

Download Issue 11 in this series, entitled "Opportunities for Policy Leadership on Supporting Workers Experiencing Domestic Violence": https://workfamily.sas.upenn.edu/sites/workfamily.sas.upenn.edu/files/imported/pdfs/policy_makers11.pdf.

Domestic Violence and the Workplace (2002)

Partnership for Prevention. (2002). Domestic violence and the workplace. Washington, D.C.: Partnership for Prevention.

This brief covers the results of four focus groups with employers on the benefits and methods of addressing domestic violence at the workplace.   

To access this document (PDF), click here: http://www.caepv.org/membercenter/files/Partnership%20For%20Prevention%20briefing%20(confidential%20document).pdf

Everybody’s Business: Quarterly Newsletter of the Corporate Alliance to End Partner Violence (2006)

Corporate Alliance to End Partner Violence. (2006). Everybody’s Business: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Corporate Alliance to End Partner Violence, 1-6.

This article provides an overview of a 2005 study which surveyed employees on their perceptions of the impact of domestic violence on the workplace and among their co-workers and whether they were aware of company policies regarding how to address this issue.

To access this document (PDF), click here: http://www.caepv.org/membercenter/files/CAEPV%20Special%20Edition%20Newsletter%202006.pdf

For more information about the Corporate Alliance to End Partner Violence, click here:  http://www.caepv.org

The Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Employee Health and Productivity (2002)

Center for Prevention and Health Services. (2002). The impact of intimate partner violence on employee health and productivity. Center for Prevention and Health Services Issue Brief, 1(3), 1-12. Retrieved July 17, 2007, from: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org/pdfs/issuebrief_cphsviolence.pdf.

“This issue brief summarizes information presented during the third in a series of Business Consultations sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).” Specifically, the brief addresses practical policies that businesses can adopt to support and protect their employees.

To access this document (PDF), click here: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org/pdfs/issuebrief_cphsviolence.pdf

Unemployment Insurance for Survivors of Domestic Violence: Fact Sheet for Advocates (2002)

National Employment Law Project. (2002). Unemployment insurance for survivors of domestic violence.. Retrieved July 17, 2007, from http://www.nelp.org/docUploads/pub135%2Epdf.

“Many victims and survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking must leave work in order to protect themselves, their families and their coworkers…These initiatives are part of a larger effort in states across the country to reform the unemployment insurance system to better meet the changing needs of today’s workers.”

To access this document (PDF), click here: http://nelp.3cdn.net/8ffcd6de3f649a187f_b2m6bn78c.pdf

For more information about the National Employment Law Project, click here: http://www.nelp.org 

Domestic Violence and Stalking in the Workplace (2007)

United States Department of Justice. Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Center for the Analysis of Violence Crime (NCAVC), Critical Incident Response Group (CIRG) . Workplace violence: Issues in response: domestic violence and stalking in the workplace, 40-45. Retrieved June 28, 2007, from: http://www.fbi.gov/page2/march04/violence030104.htm.

This overview articulates arguments for the importance of addressing domestic violence concerns in the workplace and provides steps for employers to take in identifying and supporting victims at work.

To access this document (PDF), click here: http://www.fbi.gov/publications/violence.pdf

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