Presentation

Family Responsibilities Discrimination: The Final Barrier to Women’s Equality in the Workplace

Activity Description: 

Description: Rebecca G. Pontikes wrote this Section Review for the Massachusetts Bar Association. The summary outlines the various federal and state laws in play in any FRD analysis.
To access this resource, visit: http://www.massbar.org/for-attorneys/publications/section-review/2009/v11-n2/family-responsibilities-discrimination-the-final-barrier-to-women%E2%80%99s-equality-in-the-workplace

For more information on this organization, visit: http://www.massbar.org/

Activity Source: 

Pontikes, R. G. (n.d). Section Review: Family Responsibilities Discrimination: The Final Barrier to Women’s Equality in the Workplace. Massachusetts Bar Association. Retrieved from: http://www.massbar.org/for-attorneys/publications/section-review/2009/v11-n2/family-responsibilities-discrimination-the-final-barrier-to-women%E2%80%99s-equality-in-the-workplace

Family Responsibility Discrimination (FRD): Not a Law but Still a Threat

Activity Description: 

Description: Steve Bruce, a Colorado attorney, answered questions regarding FRD for Business and Legal Reports (BLR) and the HR Daily Advisor.

To access this resource, visit: http://hrdailyadvisor.blr.com/archive/2008/07/07/HR_Policies_and_Procedures_FRD_Family_Responsibility_Discrimination_Caregiving_Pregnancy_Sandwich_Generation.aspx

For more information on this organization, visit: http://hrdailyadvisor.blr.com/about.aspx

Activity Source: 

Bruce, S. (2008, July). Family Responsibility Discrimination (FRD): Not a Llaw but still a threat. HR.BLR.Com.
Retrieved from: http://hrdailyadvisor.blr.com/archive/2008/07/07/HR_Policies_and_Procedures_FRD_Family_Responsibility_Discrimination_Caregiving_Pregnancy_Sandwich_Generation.aspx

How Do Fathers Fit In: Lesson Notes

Activity Description: 

This lesson plan (particularly intended for secondary schools) prompts students to critically analyze the roles fathers play in a children’s development by contemplating examples from literature, learning materials, and their own lives.

For more information on Civitas, the Institute for the Study of Civil Society, visit http://www.civitas.org.uk/

Activity Source: 

Civitas. (n.d.). How do fathers fit in? Lesson notes. Retrieved from http://www.civitas.org.uk/hwu/flesson.htmv

Popular Culture and Work-Family Issues

Activity Description: 

Purpose:

To demonstrate and critique the ways in which work-family issues are presented in popular culture

Steps:

  1. Show students one illustration of content presented from popular culture that illustrates the ways in which work-family relations are managed or constructed.  For example, one can show the old Enjoli commercial that integrates the song “I am a Woman” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4X4MwbVf5OA
  2. Assign students to find another representation of work-family relations from popular culture (e.g., a music video, news story, cartoon, movie trailer). Suggest that students stretch their imaginations to consider work-family content as it represents a diversity of experiences and structures (such as aging, disability, childhood, etc.).  Accompanying their brief presentation of an artifact from popular culture, students are to also present findings from one empirical study  or one statistic that considers the work-family concern presented.  For example, if the Enjoli add shows a woman energetic and satisfied in assuming the roles of worker, homemaker, and sex object, the empirical study will identify the proportion of women who are actually satisfied or energized by this arrangement. Students may search the Sloan Work and Family Literature Database http://library.bc.edu/F?func=find-b-0&local_base=BCL_WF or the Statistics Database https://workfamily.sas.upenn.edu/static/statistics to find relevant information.


Note—To keep presentation lengths manageable and to integrate as much content into the class as possible, instructors should coach students that the presentation of popular culture content should take no longer than 3 minutes, so that longer allotments of time can be devoted to discussion of that content.

Activity Source: 

Content developed by the Sloan Work and Family Teaching Task Force

Exploring the Complexities of Exceptional Caregiving

Activity Description: 

This presentation is a companion to the Boston College Center for Work & Family Executive Briefing Series. It is designed to be customized by your organization. It offers several business solutions and examples to help caregivers manage their job and family responsibilities. Please feel free to cut and paste these slides into your own format, and to use the questions provided as a guide to develop your own presentation.

Download the presentation: http://www.bc.edu/centers/cwf/research/publications/metaelements/pdf/exceptional_caregiving_pp.pdf

For copies of the full briefing, please e-mail cwf@bc.edu.

Activity Source: 

Boston College Center for Work & Family Executive Briefing Series

Employment Flexibility and Worker Well-Being: The Role of the Psychological Contract

Activity Description: 

Presented at the Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences.

Activity Source: 

Guest, D. (2006, December). Employment flexibility and worker well-being: The role of the psychological contract. Retrieved May 2, 2007, from http://www.iva.se/upload/Verksamhet/Projekt/3F/Stockholm%20December%202006.pdf.

Domestic Violence in the Workplace: A Guide for Employers

Activity Description: 

“This manual has been developed to help employers design sound, effective policies that create a safe environment when domestic violence follows a victim to work.” It includes resources on how to recognize domestic violence in the workplace, how to respond to it (policy development and safety planning), and guides for training to resolve domestic violence in the workplace. 

Activity Source: 

Alabama Coalition Against Domestic Violence & Verizon Wirelesss. (2006). Domestic violence in the workplace: A guide for employers. Retrieved July 19, 2007, from http://www.acadv.org/DVManualPDF2.pdf.

Fair Labor Standards Act: Drafting a Proposal for Compensatory Time under the FLSA, A Suggested Work and Family Class Activity

Activity Description: 

Purpose
To conduct a critical analysis of the existing provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act

Steps

  1. Log onto the website for the Department of Labor. Locate the page for the FLSA document; or download the statute directly from: www.dol.gov/dol/esa/public/regs/statutes/whd/0002.fair.pdf
  2. Select one or more provisions of the legislation.
  3. Consider the positive and negative consequences of the provision for different types of employers (e.g., workplaces of different sizes, business in different industries, etc.).
  4. Consider the positive and negative consequences of the provision for different types of employees (e.g., employees holding different types of positions, employees with different types of family responsibilities).
  5. Propose at least one change in the FLSA to reflect your analysis.
Activity Source: 

Content contributed by Carol Nowicki, as a Suggested Work and Family Class Activity for the Sloan Networks’ Resources for Teaching section.

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