Other

Family-Friendly Work Practices

Activity Description: 

Description: Course syllabus regarding Family-Friendly Work Practices, which includes a unit on FRD and its implications.

To access this resource, visit: http://www4.uwm.edu/mhrlr/advising/upload/INDREL800sp10.pdf

Activity Source: 

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Spring, 2010: The course is part of the Master’s in Human Relations and Labor Relations at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Employment Discrimination Law

Activity Description: 

Description: Course syllabus on employment discrimination, which includes extensive treatment of FRD. The course is part of the Loyola University School of Law curriculum.

To access this resource, visit: http://www.luc.edu/law/academics/first_class_assgn/pdfs/cooper/emp_discrimination_syllabus.pdf

Activity Source: 

Loyola University School of Law, Spring, 2010.

Gender and Leadership

Activity Description: 

Description: A course syllabus by Alice Eagly and Linda Carli regarding gender and leadership, which includes a section on FRD.

To access this resource, visit: http://hbsp.harvard.edu/he-main/resources/documents/web-files/GenderandLeadershipsyllabus.pdf

Activity Source: 

Eagly, A. & Carli, L. The course is part of the Harvard Business School curriculum.

Enforcement Guidance: Unlawful Disparate Treatment of Workers With Caregiving Responsibilities

Activity Description: 

The EEOC’s enforcement guidelines regarding handling FRD in the workplace, created by the Title VII/EPA/ADEA Division, Office of Legal Counsel.

To access this resource, visit: http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/caregiving.html

For more information about this organization, visit: http://www.eeoc.gov

Activity Source: 

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (2007, May 23). Enforcement guidance: Unlawful disparate treatment of workers with caregiving responsibilities, in E.E.O.C. Compliance Manual, 2, § 615. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from: http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/caregiving.pdf

Secrets to Better Fathering: Balancing Work & Family

Activity Description: 

This webinar presents resources and solutions for both employers and employees for facilitating a healthier work-family balance.

Activity Source: 

National Fatherhood Initiative. (2007). Secrets to better fathering: Balancing work & family. Retrieved from  http://www.fatherhood.org/Webinars

Father Involvement Research Alliance

Activity Description: 

This packet not only introduces the Father Involvement Research Alliance, a “national partnership building with researchers, practitioners, policy makers and fathers,” but also serves to address the needs and concerns of different populations of fathers in regard to caretaking.

For more information on the Father Involvement Research Alliance, visit http://www.fira.ca/

Activity Source: 

FIRA: Father Involvement Research Alliance. (n.d.). Guelph, Ontario: University of Guelph. Retrieved July 21, 2009, from http://www.ecdip.org/docs/pdf/FIRA%20Overview%20Presentation.pdf

Rosabeth Moss Kanter Awards for Excellence in Work-Family Research – A Classroom Resource

Activity Description: 

To expose students to studies recognized as the “best of the best” research on work and family.

Opportunities for Integration in Course Assignments:

The Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research is a partnership of the Center for Families at Purdue University, the Center for Work and Family at Boston College, and the Alliance of Work-Life Progress.  This award raises awareness of high quality work-family research among the scholar, consultant, and practitioner communities. The award is named for Rosabeth Moss Kanter, who leading scholars have identified as the person with the most influence on modern work and family research literature. The Kanter award is given to the authors who publish the best work-family research article during a calendar year.

As of 2009, ten Kanter awards had been given, representing a range of research questions and methods (see below).  The Sloan Work and Family Teaching Task Force developed a teaching module designed to expose graduate level students to engage in critical analysis of research methods of these articles.  In addition, teachers may consider having students engage in class presentations of these articles or integrating them into reading assignments.  Articles can be retrieved via the Sloan Work and Family Literature Database and further information on the Kanter awards can be found here.

Kanter Award Winners:

2008: Shelley J. Correll, Stephen Benard, and In Paik
Correll, S.J., Benard, S., & Piak, I. (2007). Getting a job: Is there a motherhood penalty? American Journal of Sociology, 112, 1297-1338.

2007: Jeremy Reynolds and Lydia Aletraris
Reynolds, J., & Aletraris, L. (2006). Pursuing preferences: The creation and resolution of work hour mismatches. American Sociological Review, 71, 618-638.

2006: Hadas Mandel and Moshe Semyonov
Mandel, H., & Semyonov, M. (2005). Family Policies, Wage Structures, and Gender Gaps: Sources of Earning Inequality in 20 Countries. American Sociological Review, Volume 70, pp. 949-967.

2005: Naomi Gerstel and Natalia Sarkisian
Sarkisian, N., & Gerstel, N. (2004). Explaining the Gender Gap in Help to Parents: The Importance of Employment. Journal of Marriage and Family, Volume 66, pp. 431-451.

2004: Marybeth Mattingly and Susan M. Bianchi
Mattingly, M. J., & Bianchi, S. M. (2003). Gender Differences in the Quantity and Quality of Free Time: The U.S. Experience. Social Forces, Volume 81, pp. 999-1030.

2003: Michelle J. Budig
Budig, M. J. (2002). Male advantage and the gender composition of jobs: Who rides the glass escalator? Social Problems, 49(2). 40

2002: Jerry A. Jacobs and Kathleen Gerson
Jacobs, J.A., and Gerson, K. (2001). Overworked Individuals or Overworked Families? Explaining Trends in Work, Leisure, and Family Time. Work and Occupations, Volume 28, pp. 40-63.

2001: Suzanne M. Bianchi
Bianchi, S. M. (2000). Maternal employment and time with children: Dramatic change or surprising continuity? Demography, 37(4), 401-414.

2001: Harriet B. Presser
Presser, H. B. (2000). Nonstandard work schedules and marital instability. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 62, 93-110.

2000: Erin Kelly and Frank Dobbin 
Kelly, E., & Dobbin, F. (1999). Civil Rights Law at work: Sex discrimination and the rise of maternity leave policies. American Journal of Sociology, 105(2), 455-492.

Activity Source: 

Content developed by the Sloan Work and Family Teaching Task Force

Orienting Students to Work-Family Content on the Sloan Work and Family Research Network - 1

Activity Description: 

Purpose:

Orient students to content presented in the Sloan Work and Family Research Network.

Steps:


Present students with the following instructions in the first week of class.  Their reflection paper is due shortly thereafter.

This assignment is designed to help me get to know you and to help you become familiar with the Sloan Work-Family website, a resource that we will use throughout the semester. This assignment requires posting a 700-to-800 word essay about the way that work and family responsibilities were handled in your own family when you were growing up and how you hope to combine -or not combine -work and family yourself. Before you begin writing, take a look at the Sloan website. On the left-hand side of the page, click on “Topics Pages.” Read about any two topics that interest you. Be sure to take a look at some of items in the drop-down menus on the topics pages you choose, such as “Statistics,” “Definitions,” “Overviews,” or “Encyclopedia.” In your essay, identify and discuss the two topics you explored on the web site. How did these two issues affect you growing up? How do you imagine yourself handling these issues if you have children or other family members to care for down the road?

Activity Source: 

Content developed by the Sloan Work and Family Teaching Task Force

Orienting Students to Work-Family Content on the Sloan Work and Family Research Network - 2

Activity Description: 

Purpose:

Orient students to content presented in the Sloan Work and Family Research Network and to facilitate an atmosphere of “discussion” that will (hopefully) continue throughout the semester.  Note, this presents an alternative to the teaching activity Orienting Students to Work-Family Content on the Sloan Work and Family Research Network -1.


Steps:

  1. In the first class, present students with the following instructions for a short assignment they are to complete before the second class. Take about a half an hour and explore the different types of entries and issues presented on the Sloan Work and Family Research Network.  Bring one interesting concept, statistic, or fact to share with the class.
  2. In the second class, have students share these observations.  As they do so, explain the ways these observations may relate to some content that will become the focus of the remainder of the semester>
Activity Source: 

Content developed by the Sloan Work and Family Teaching Task Force

Coping With Work and Family Stress

Activity Description: 

"Coping With Work and Family Stress is a workplace preventive intervention designed to teach employees 18 years and older how to deal with stressors at work and at home. The model is derived from Pearlin and Schooler's hierarchy of coping mechanisms as well as Bandura's social learning theory. The 16 90-minute sessions, typically provided weekly to groups of 15-20 employees, teach effective methods for reducing risk factors (stressors and avoidance coping) and enhancing protective factors (active coping and social support) through behavior modification (e.g., methods to modify or eliminate sources of stress), information sharing (e.g., didactic presentations, group discussions), and skill development (e.g., learning effective communication and problem-solving skills, expanding use of social network)."

Activity Source: 

Snow, D.L. (2007). Coping with work and family stress. Retrieved from http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/programfulldetails.asp?PROGRAM_ID=142

Syndicate content