Health

I Refuse to Be Busy

Type of News Item: 
Blog
Title of News Item: 
I Refuse to Be Busy
Source: 
New York Times Motherlode

Two Years Later ... Still Stressed and Pressed

Type of News Item: 
News Article
Title of News Item: 
Two Years Later ... Still Stressed and Pressed
Source: 
Workforce

Companies continue to ask workers to do more with less. But there are signs that organizations have hit a tipping point and are starting to jeopardize their future success.

Does The Influence Of Time & Place Management (Tpm) Policies On Work Engagement Vary By Physical Health Status?

Type of News Item: 
Report
Title of News Item: 
Does The Influence Of Time & Place Management (Tpm) Policies On Work Engagement Vary By Physical Health Status?
Source: 
Sloan Center on Aging and Work

March 2014--Health is a critical issue for the aging workforce, in part because age is correlated with the onset and worsening of some health conditions. Workers in poor health often retire earlier than they had planned. Workers with health conditions who do remain in the labor force may become less engaged in their jobs due to the strain associated with health limitations.

Google’s Scientific Approach to Work-Life Balance (and Much More)

Type of News Item: 
Blog
Title of News Item: 
Google’s Scientific Approach to Work-Life Balance (and Much More)
Source: 
Harvard Business Review

"What do we hope to learn? In the short-term, how to improve wellbeing, how to cultivate better leaders, how to keep Googlers engaged for longer periods of time, how happiness impacts work and how work impacts happiness."

Stop Contributing to the Workplace Chaos

Type of News Item: 
News Article
Title of News Item: 
Stop Contributing to the Workplace Chaos
Source: 
The Weekly Wonk

"Not every office can function like a Silicon Valley tech company -- permitting staffers to work wherever and whenever they please, and lessening that daily sensation of teetering along a balance beam...or juggling plates...or insert work-life balance cliché here. But most workplaces can do better at creating flexible policies that allow employees to have a life separate from work. We recently asked a group of experts -- what's something that every company can do to make that work-life balance easier?"

Includes comments from WFRN members Leslie Hammer and Cali Williams Yost

Let's Stop the Glorification of Busy

Type of News Item: 
Blog
Title of News Item: 
Let's Stop the Glorification of Busy
Source: 
Huffington Post

The architecture of how we live our lives is badly in need of renovation and repair. What we really value is out of sync with how we live our lives. And the need is urgent for some new blueprints to reconcile the two. -- Arianna Huffington

How One Company Contained Health Care Costs and Improved Morale

Type of News Item: 
Blog
Title of News Item: 
How One Company Contained Health Care Costs and Improved Morale
Source: 
Harvard Business Review Blog Network

"Instead of simply providing health insurance, savvy employers are tackling health care costs by supporting the whole employee--everything from their finances to their career development to physical health. This is not just good for individuals; it's good for business."

Don’t Let Your Career Cause Regrets in Your Personal Life

Type of News Item: 
Blog
Title of News Item: 
Don’t Let Your Career Cause Regrets in Your Personal Life
Source: 
Harvard Business Review Blog Network

How Cancer Made Work Flexibility a Necessity for a Working Mom

Type of News Item: 
Blog
Title of News Item: 
How Cancer Made Work Flexibility a Necessity for a Working Mom
Source: 
WorkFlexibility.org

Kristin Thomas, a mother of four who went back to work in 2013 after being a SAHM with her young boys, writes

Family Matters Caregiving in America

Type of News Item: 
Report
Title of News Item: 
Family Matters Caregiving in America
Source: 
Center fro American Progress

"Despite the best efforts of some policymakers and health care innovators, it is unlikely that we will see a drop in the need for informal and unpaid caregivers anytime soon. Consequently, it is especially important for workers to have access to benefits such as workplace flexibility and paid family leave should they need to take time to care for themselves or a loved one. Supporting caregivers with these policies will go a long way toward recognizing our invaluable informal care community and increasing cost savings for taxpayers by reducing costly hospital and nursing home stays."

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